Psychedelics and Male-Perpetrated Violence

A version of this article was originally published on The Third Wave

WARNING:This article describes violent acts, and links to discussions with hateful violent language.

In April this year, a man drove a van across busy pedestrian streets in Toronto, killing 10 and injuring more. It was the deadliest mass homicide in the city’s history.

The murderer identified himself with the growing “incel” movement – a term with origins in sexual frustration (the word “incel”  is a portmanteau of the misnomer “involuntary celibate”) that has now been appropriated by a nebulous group of disgruntled men who believe that society is rigged against them, dooming them to a life without the sex they’re entitled to.

Mostly confined to online forums, the number of people defining themselves as incels is hard to pin down – although a recent surge in searches for “incel” and the media attention following the Toronto attack suggests that its popularity is on the rise.

The online gathering-places for the modern incel are littered with calls for misogynistic violence, rape, and coercion. When incels aren’t praising the violent actions of mass murderers, or urging others to act in a similar fashion – they’re spreading brutal misogynistic propaganda promoting rape, domestic abuse, and pedophilia.

The reasons behind the surge in incel ideologies are many and complex: harmful patriarchal gender conventions; the normalization of aggression in young boys; the struggle some men encounter in connecting with their emotions. There are dozens of models to explain the attractiveness of incel philosophies to the modern man. But no matter what psychological and societal reasons for incelhood, the movement is inarguably associated with violence.

structure-746577_1280

Male-perpetrated violence is, unsurprisingly, soaked throughout culture and history. It’s not just a phenomenon confined to the bloody sands of ancient battlefields or the slave trade of America and Europe’s shameful legacies. It’s reflected in modern domestic violence statistics, showing that male-perpetrated domestic violence accounts for 91% of all domestic abuse prosecutions, and that 87% of all domestic homicides are perpetrated by men.

There is clearly a very current, prevalent, systemic issue with male-perpetrated violence in society. The incel movement is just another way in which this problem is being highlighted. And we need to do something about it.

Continue reading

Advertisements

New Clues In The Psychedelic Treatment Of Depression

A version of this article was originally published on High Existence, and The Third Wave.

Depression, despite affecting millions worldwide, is still a condition that we don’t fully understand.

In fact, we understand it so poorly that typical pharmaceutical treatments indiscriminately target whole neurochemical systems, resulting in unstable effectiveness and a host of side-effects.

Up to 44% of people suffering from depression have not found relief from typical antidepressant therapies. Even patients who find some form of relief from the usual prescribed antidepressants need frequent doses, sometimes causing unpleasant side-effects, and these drugs often lose their effectiveness after several years of treatment.

But where pharmaceuticals are failing, psychedelics could be a new hope.

Continue reading

Can Ayahuasca Prompt Neurogenesis?

This was originally published on The Third Wave – you can read the original article here.

The past few months has seen an explosion of research into the therapeutic potential of ayahuasca, the traditional psychoactive brew used by indigenous South American peoples for generations. It’s now looking highly compelling that doses of the plant-based drink have antidepressant qualities, and could also be used to combat addiction and PTSD.

Earlier last year, the announcement that scientists had discovered a potential mechanism for ayahuasca’s antidepressant properties was met with great anticipation. Researchers reported that under laboratory conditions several compounds found in ayahuasca could encourage the growth of new brain cells. Since that announcement, we’ve been excited about getting our hands on the full study!

Continue reading

How Psychedelic Therapy Could Shift Our Understanding Of Mental Health

I know, it’s been a while! I’m sorry! I’ve been busy working for The Third Wave and other ventures… the psychedelic movement is constantly gaining ground these days.

This latest (ghost-written) article of mine is intended to explain why we need to change the way we treat mental health issues, and how psychedelics could be the catalyst for a paradigm shift in mental health therapy.

Read it here!

Microdosing Psychedelics for ADHD

It’s been a while since the last post here at The Psychedelic Scientist! I’ve been busy working for The Third Wave, a site that offers advice and resources about psychedelics and microdosing.

It’s an exciting time in the psychedelic movement, as more people are coming out and describing how experiences with psychedelics have shaped their lives.

In my most recent article, I hear from some of the many people who microdose with psychedelics in order to treat a mental health condition – in this case, adult ADHD.

I hope you enjoy it – and consider checking out the other resources at The Third Wave.

 

 

Crafting the Modern Psychedelic Ceremony – “Getting Higher”

It’s been over fifty years since Timothy Leary, Ralph Metzner and Richard Alpert wrote “The Psychedelic Experience.” It was intended to be a psychedelic manual for the first generation of Western mind-explorers; people who desperately lacked a cultural background for their psychedelic journeys.

Unsurprisingly, this half-century old book has lost some of its applicability in modern psychedelic culture.

Stepping into the void is occultist and academic Julian Vayne, who has just released “Getting Higher” – a manual of psychedelic ceremony for the modern psychonaut. Here’s my review of this hallucinogenic handbook.

Getting_Higher_by_Julian_Vayne_1024x1024

Continue reading

Heroin – the most stigmatised drug?

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about the enormous stigma that surrounds heroin.

Even people within the drug-using community who detest prohibition will often be heard saying something like “Yeah, legalise everything… but not heroin. Never heroin.

Why is this the case? Is there evidence to support the view of heroin as the most harmful, addictive drug around?

Continue reading

Scapegoat for Murder

This article was originally written for The Third Wave.

The tragic death of Jake Cawte near Adelaide in Australia had only barely hit the press before the finger was pointed at ayahuasca.

Jake was shot by his twin brother Luke at their family home, using one of their father’s weapons. Despite Luke’s previous issues with mental health, it was their brief encounter with ayahuasca that has, without any basis in fact, been blamed for this act of violence.

Continue reading

LSD for Depression? Absolutely.

I wrote this article for The Third Wave, where it originally appeared, as a response to an opinion piece in the New York Times from skeptical clinical psychiatrist Richard Friedman. I think it can help address the typical arguments that come from people of anti-psychedelic bias. Enjoy!

A recent article in the New York Times, penned by clinical psychiatrist Richard Friedman, attempts to scare his audience into thinking that LSD might not be a good treatment for depression, despite a barrage of recent studies suggesting otherwise. Friedman appears to be of the opinion that it would be wrong to offer these drugs to sufferers of disease; even though there is no evidence of harm from LSD or psilocybin when given in a clinical setting, and despite the growing body of evidence of the efficacy of these drugs in treating mental health conditions.

light-2076781_640

Friedman himself mentions the debilitating nature of depression; between a third and one-half of all patients will never find relief from conventional treatments. Hundreds of millions suffer worldwide, and hundreds of thousands commit suicide every year. Most of those sufferers don’t have access to the expensive treatments most commonly handed out by psychiatrists in the developed world.

Continue reading